Medical Malpractice

POSTSURGICAL BLINDNESS: Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (PION) Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on March 8, 2016

Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy, or PION, occurs when the back region of the optic nerve leading to one or (usually) both eyes dies. There are multiple times of PION, but potentially the most disturbing occurs following general anesthesia for surgery.  In postsurgical ischemic optic neuropathy, a patient wakes up from surgery moderately to severely blind, […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on March 8, 2016

Understanding the Risks Associated with Pitocin in Inducing Labor

by Chris Kuhlman on February 10, 2016

  The birth of a child is often the most joyful time of a parent’s life and thankfully most child deliveries happen without incident.  In order to ensure a smooth delivery, doctors and medical staff must devote their utmost care and attention to make informed decisions and recommendations. This includes informing the mother about the […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on February 10, 2016

Birth Injuries caused by delayed Cesarean Section

by Chris Kuhlman on February 9, 2016

A Caesarian section, or C-section, is an alternative to vaginal delivery of a baby.  In a C-section, a doctor makes an incision across a mother’s abdomen, either vertically if it’s an emergency or in a series of horizontal steps through the layers of muscle, fat, and other tissue to expose the uterus.  The doctor then […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on February 9, 2016

Birth Injury to the Spinal Cord and Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on February 4, 2016

  During the delivery of a baby, forceps (a tool used to grasp and maneuver the head) can cause temporary or permanent injury to various parts of the spinal cord.  These injuries, which can be bruises or tears, occur in various ways, depending on how the forceps were used and how the baby was positioned. […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on February 4, 2016

Endocarditis Diagnosis and Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on January 25, 2016

Endocarditis is an infection of the endocardium, the layer of cells lining the inside of the heart. Various bacteria (or occasionally fungi) cause endocarditis by spreading from their original locations in the body, through the bloodstream, and landing on damaged parts of a heart. It is very rare for people with healthy, undamaged hearts to […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 25, 2016

MRSA Skin Infections and Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on January 18, 2016

  MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is a highly infectious bacterium that does not respond to many ordinary antibiotics.  As a result, it is particularly common in healthcare settings, including nursing homes.  When acquired in those settings, it is called HA-MRSA (healthcare-associated MRSA).  HA-MRSA usually occurs through direct contact with infected skin, or contact with […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 18, 2016

Anaphylaxis (allergic reactions) and Minnesota Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on January 15, 2016

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that occurs quickly after a sensitive person is exposed to an allergic trigger, and if not treated quickly and correctly, it is often life-threatening. Common allergens that trigger anaphylaxis, usually at the second or later exposure to the allergen, involve certain foods, latex, medication, insect stings. It can also […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 15, 2016

Breast Cancer and Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on January 15, 2016

  Invasive breast cancer strikes one in eight women in the U.S., and one in a thousand men, over the course of their lifetimes.  Surprisingly, only about 5-10% of breast cancer patients are known to have developed the cancer as a result of inherited genes, such as the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.  Most breast cancer […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 15, 2016

Medical Negligence in Diagnosing Appendicits

by Chris Kuhlman on January 12, 2016

What is appendicitis? Appendicitis is the inflammation of the appendix, a pocket of tissue that extends from the large intestines on the lower right side of the torso.  The appendix is a vestigial organ, meaning it doesn’t have an obvious purpose in modern humans but used to be a functioning part of our very early […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 12, 2016

Lung Cancer and Medical Malpractice

by Chris Kuhlman on January 11, 2016

  Lung cancer is a leading cause of death in the US and in the world as a whole – in both men and women, it is also one of the most lethal forms of cancer. It is especially common in smokers and former smokers, particularly after exposure to other chemicals such as radon or […]

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by Chris Kuhlman on January 11, 2016